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Britsh and American Equivilents

 

Common British and American cooking product (ingredient) equivalences

 

American to British Recipe Terms

Some common American ingredient terminology translated into the equivalent British term.

American Term British Term
all-purpose flour plain flour
bacon streaky bacon
bread flour strong flour
broil grill (with oven)
broiling grilling (with oven)
casserole bake
Canadian bacon bacon
dark brown sugar demerara sugar
eggplant aubergine
flour plain flour
graham crackers digestive biscuits
granulated sugar (or just sugar) castor sugar
karo syrup (corn syrup) golden syrup
half and half single cream
ham gammon
heavy cream double cream
light cream single cream
molasses treacle
navy beans haricot beans
pie cherries Morello cherries
pumpkin pie spice mixed spice
seedless raisins sultanas
semi-sweet chocolate dark cooking chocolate
tomato paste tomato puree
turnips swedes
whipping cream double cream
zucchini courgette

British to American Terms

Some common British ingredient terminology translated into the equivalent American term.

British Term American Term
aubergine eggplant
bacon ham or Canadian Bacon
castor sugar superfine granulated sugar
courgette zucchini
dark cooking chocolate semi-sweet chocolate
demerara sugar dark brown sugar
digestive biscuits graham crackers
double cream whipping cream, heavy cream
gammon ham
golden syrup light karo syrup (corn syrup)
grill broil (with oven)
grilling broiling (with oven)
haricot beans navy beans
mixed spice substitute pumpkin pie spice
Morello cherries pie cherries
plain flour all-purpose flour
single cream light cream
strong flour bread flour
sultanas seedless light raisins
treacle molasses
tomato puree tomato paste
streaky bacon bacon
swedes turnips

 

 

Comments

Portland, United States
 almost 3 years ago

You are mistaken posting that seedless raisins =sultanas. The American equivalent of sultanas are sold as "golden raisins." They are, I believe made from green grapes rather than red or purple grapes.

Inver Grove Heights, United States
 almost 3 years ago

You are correct about sultanas being dried white grapes. In England sultanas are smaller than than regular raisins. They are also a bit sweeter. Great for baking.AZZ

Taylorsville, United States
 almost 3 years ago

incorrect on British term for Swede, American equivalent turnip. NOT SO
American equivalent is rutabaga

Santa Maria, United States
 over 2 years ago

Golden syrup is not same as corn syrup! You can sometimes get away with substituting one for the other, but you best not count on it.


 over 2 years ago

Castor sugar is actually baking sugar, which is a finer particle size than regular granulated sugar. Or bar sugar (from what I’ve read - I’ve only used baking sugar)

also called superfine can sugar. dominos distributes it everywhere in U.S.

Home chef
, United States
 about 1 year ago
Nuneaton, United Kingdom
 over 1 year ago

You should really re-do this list. It’s filled with inaccuracies.

, United States
 about 1 year ago

What is musqvarna sugar

this looks like a bad typo. sounds like muscovado sugar. you can substitute homemade brown sugar: 1 tbsp molasses to 1 cup granulated sugar. it'll come close, mores than turbinado sugar.

Home chef
, United States
 about 1 year ago
Denver, United States
 about 1 year ago

What is the American equivalent to cornflour in the UK?

i use corn starch when the brits say cornflour.

Home chef
, United States
 about 1 year ago
, United States
 about 1 year ago

i agree with all the inaccuracies posted in comments. also missing: sweet paste. what is it called in U.S?

, United States
 about 1 year ago

i use corn starch when the brits say cornflour.

, United States
 about 1 year ago

this looks like a bad typo. sounds like muscovado sugar. you can substitute homemade brown sugar: 1 tbsp molasses to 1 cup granulated sugar. it'll come close, mores than turbinado sugar.

, United States
 about 1 year ago

also called superfine can sugar. dominos distributes it everywhere in U.S.

Lindley, United States
 12 months ago

Came across a British recipe and it calls for single sugar? Do you know what this is thanks

El Segundo, United States
 9 months ago

Is superfine sugar the American version of icing sugar

Ottawa, Canada
 8 months ago

Icing suger is American powdered sugar

, United Kingdom
 8 months ago

What does it mean when it says shortening?

I know what shortening is in USA but not what it's called in the UK. It's a solid, neutral-flavored fat often used in piecrust, cookies, or in frying. It often used to be partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, but since we've learned that is unhealthy, it's often palm oil now. You can substitute lard (rendered pork fat) also.

Home chef
, United States
 7 months ago
North Las Vegas, United States
 7 months ago

there is no such thing as single sugar in England. From a Brit. Also sultanas are much bigger and sweeter that raisins. Which is what there is here in .the States

, United States
 7 months ago

I know what shortening is in USA but not what it's called in the UK. It's a solid, neutral-flavored fat often used in piecrust, cookies, or in frying. It often used to be partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, but since we've learned that is unhealthy, it's often palm oil now. You can substitute lard (rendered pork fat) also.

Texarkana, United States
 5 months ago

What is maze in England?


London, United Kingdom
 3 months ago

I thin shortening is called lard in the UK

J
Ephrata, United States
 about 2 months ago

REDO THE LIST

JWSUK
London, United Kingdom
 about 1 month ago

Shortening sounds like lard - generally pork (or beef in some places) fat which makes piecrusts.
This is not the same as vegetable oil or palm oil, as it is not plant based.

I agree with everyone about sultanas. Maybe they are thinking of currants? I would need to find someone who likes dried fruit to answer that for sure.

Icing sugar I think is either confectioners sugar or powdered sugar in the usa.

Turnips and swedes are completely different (although to be fair they are both root vegetables) I agree that it's probably rutabaga in the USA. I think turnips are more white, as opposed to swede which is a yellowy/orange colour.

Not all bacon is called streaky bacon here! We have back bacon, streaky bacon, bacon joints (although to be fair that's very similar if not identical to, gammon joints), smoky bacon, bacon lardons etc. I prefer back bacon as there's less fat for the way we cook our bacon, although crispy american bacon is lovely.

Ham here is very diverse also... although yes what you call "a ham" is a gammon joint, or what we call gammon steaks the usa probably call ham steaks.

JWS
London, United Kingdom
 about 1 month ago

For the usa lunch meat is accepted for pretty much all deli meat options. Here, luncheon meat is a very specific type of ham/deli meat so if you ask for lunch meat here you'll get that. Or maybe Spam. You would not get offered salt beef, honey roast ham, breaded ham, corned beef, sliced chicken etc.

What you call grilled cheese we call a cheese toasty. Or a Welsh Rarebit depending upon how it's prepared.

What you call pudding is absolutely not what you would get in the UK. Pudding here is similar to cake (think sticky toffee pudding) but it is made with suet. Likewise if you were to have a meat pie here (or pie as we would say) that would be made with regular pastry, but a steak and kidney pudding etc would be made with suet. Both of these would be steamed instead of baked in the oven.

I think it's not demerera which would be your dark brown sugar - demerara is more golden brown and has a distinctive smell. Whereas brown sugar is indeed brown and there are other types of sugar which are darker still.

TL;DR - this page needs a LOT of corrections.

 

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